‘There Must Be a Pony Here Somewhere’

By Bronte Baxter

It’s the nature of those who love truth to find it. Truth is more important to them than comfort zones or any material thing. Truth seekers are on the lookout for cracks in their world, sensing that where inconsistency is found, a deeper truth lies beneath, waiting to be discovered. The sincere researcher doesn’t only apply this attitude to things he hears from identified deceivers. He applies it impartially to his own beliefs and those of people he respects.

On the morning of 9/11, I remember sitting in front of my TV as news reporters announced that two different people onboard the plane that crashed in Pennsylvania reported by cell phone to their loved ones that they heard an explosion then saw (through the window) smoke coming out of the side of the plane. These passenger reports happened right before communication went dead.

This story was on the air for just a few minutes, then the smoke and explosion were never mentioned again, as if the report had never existed. If indeed there was an explosion and smoke, that indicates something very different happened than the official story. Was the plane shot down? Did the powers-that-be bury this news report to hide that? This is an example of truth shining through the cracks, revealing itself through the discrepancies.

Liars can’t help revealing truths alongside their deceptions. David Icke, in one of his books, quotes someone as saying that America is like a man with an unfaithful wife who can’t admit the truth of what she is doing. All the clues are there, but the man won’t let himself see.

Building on this analogy, truth seekers are like the husband questioning the unfaithful wife. He knows she’s having an affair, knows she’s answering his questions with lies, but he keeps on questioning because along with the lies, bits of truth inadvertently come out.

Think about the times you’ve had to question a vehemently lying child. Why did you bother, when you knew you were going to get fibs stacked on fibs? Because you knew if you asked enough questions, the right questions, the kid would trip over his own story and spill some or all of the truth.

In the same way, the questioning by the multitudes who are no longer willing to accept the official version of 9/11 and other media fairy tales puts this world’s big-time deceivers under close scrutiny, forcing them to come up with better explanations and new subterfuges. What we glimpse between the contradictory new and old explanations, between the changing masks, is the truth we are looking for.

That’s how a lawyer exposes a liar in court and proves what really occurred: he finds the inconsistencies in the story. The producers of Loose Change have created a new documentary on the death of John F. Kennedy, Junior, presenting a strong argument, through discrepancies in news reports and investigations, that JFK’s son was murdered. The film astutely observes that whenever TV news anchors revise their version of what happened immediately after a major news event, that typically indicates a cover-up and something worth looking into.

A lot of aware people believe that mankind is on the verge of “waking up,” of seeing through all the illusions around us. Is there any foundation for such a belief? There is, if the nature of truth seekers is to expose lie after lie until they discover what’s at the bottom. There is, if the nature of truth is to be known.

It is the nature of truth to be known, if we all have a collective memory of it deep within our consciousness. If on some level all are connected, if we have existed in lifetimes before this, our souls carry a memory of both our personal past and the past of the universe. We carry within us the history of creation, albeit that’s typically an unopened book. Our collective memory must assert itself eventually. It’s already starting to do so. The surprise is, not that we might remember where we came from and how we got here, but that we haven’t known it all along.

Tampering with our minds by fourth-dimensional deceivers (see my previous articles) causes the planet’s collective case of amnesia. But it takes effort for the deception to continue, and anything that must be supported by effort will in time succumb to that which is effortless and natural. Truth is natural. Lies need supported. Truth is self-sustaining. Lies need tireless entities to keep on holding them in place.

By nature, truth bobs to the surface. What happens when a killer tries to hide a corpse? He buries it, and someone finds the disturbed earth. He throws it in the river, and it floats upstream to shore. Truth is like a beach-ball that liars attempt to hold underwater. It will stay down only as long as constant pressure is applied. The moment the liars take a rest, get distracted, or slip up, the truth-ball pops to the surface again. Every time this happens, a few more eyes see it.

To stay ahead of mankind’s emerging awareness, to try and beat the truth in its nature to rise and be known, deceiving leaders are forced to add more truth to the lie-mix each time they create a new political excuse or remodeled spiritual teaching (a point David Icke elucidated in his May 4 newsletter).

We could call this the “yes but” phenomenon. The deceivers concede “yes, that’s true” because a large percentage of the public has seen through some lie they promoted. They then add a “but” and place their spin on the truth they have admitted, forming a new lie, excusing their former deceit, and pushing the truth-bottle down one more time. Icke cites the new book Superclass as an example of this trick. (It was written by one of the global elite, admits the existence of the global elite, then colors the character of the global elite as just a group of guys getting together over the golf course.)

The “yes but” strategy serves an added purpose: it makes deceivers appear like sources that can be trusted. If you bring out enough new insights, which impress or even help people, the public’s more likely to swallow everything you tell them, including the hook beneath your bait.

We see this a lot in new spiritual teachings, which bring out new perspectives on reality. Such teachers give answers that “improve on” understandings that preceded them, and that possibly even unfold more about our history and the nature of reality. But the teachings are laced with the old lies, dressed up in better clothes, that continue keeping disciples from experiencing self-empowerment.

The same strategy of detecting truth behind media or political lies can be applied to popular systems of thought. Religions and spiritual teachings, that lead people to feel ashamed of their “sins” or weighed down by their “egoistic small selves,” demonstrate quick costume changes to keep us from seeing their fundamental flaws.

Modern Indian gurus, for instance, are starting to denounce the caste system, even though it was supported by gurus for centuries and in spite of the fact that Lord Krishna himself, in the Bhagavad-Gita, spoke in defense of it. But gurus are losing customers over this teaching. So now they switch their tune, claiming it was human, ignorant misinterpretation of divine teachings that created the castes. In scripture, the castes were only meant to be symbolic, they tell us. “It’s only symbolic” and “human misinterpretation” are the excuse-all explanations that every religion uses to justify its worst historical and scriptural atrocities.

Human awareness has risen to where it will no longer passively tolerate injustices like caste. The questioning of doctrine this leads to could take down Eastern religion, so one dogma is thrown out in order to retain the worshippers. This is not unlike the practice on old ships of tossing the heavy stores overboard, regardless of the value of their contents, if the ship itself threatens to sink.

A recent news article talks about Timothy Ellis, the bishop who is organizing the “U2-charist,” where lyrics by rock-star Bono (along with a pulsating light-show) replace traditional hymns at church services. In explaining the importance to religion of renovating its own façade, Bishop Ellis said, “We need to try new expressions. If we don’t try to update and refresh our thinking, we will die.”

Can we look between the lines (at the cracks) and translate that? Is Ellis really saying that without maintaining dogmas and rituals that appeal, dogmas and rituals that inspire people to surrender their “soma or “loosh,” those who created religion and feed off its energy fear they might die?

Truth shines through the cracks, in politics, media and religion. It’s useful to question the lying politician and the spiffed-up spiritual teaching because examination reveals much behind the renovations and the tell-tale discrepancies. Eventually you piece together the picture, which the lies can never fully conceal if you look with attention.

When I was a girl, my father was a repetitive joke teller: one of those males from the World War II generation who liked canned jokes and was always button-holing people to listen. I routinely tuned him out when he did this, but two of his anecdotes have stuck with me through my life. I think it’s because of their wisdom.

The first is a joke every reader born before 1970 will groan at in recognition:

“What did the little optimist say when he woke up on his birthday to find a cartload of manure dumped in front of his porch steps?

“There’s got to be a pony here somewhere!’”

Submerged in the corniness, there’s something about that child, confidently looking for his pony, that makes us smile. He reminds us of the part of ourselves that’s determined to find the good underneath all the garbage in this world, the part that believes that goodness, not indifference, has to be the ultimate reality. The joke also reminds us of our confidence that we can and will find the truth. We routinely piece and pick through the horse-shit, the propaganda of our leaders, in an effort to find the pony. We know we’ll get to it if we look long enough.

The second joke, which I’ll end with, demonstrates the zeal for knowledge that refuses to accept defeat, that attempts to learn and solve things even in the face of utter failure. Maybe the two characters in this second anecdote never meet the fate that seems in store for them. Maybe they’ll remain forever suspended, making us smile and inspiring us:

A pilot in a small plane suddenly loses engine power. The plane starts to dive, and the pilot parachutes out. After falling away from the plane some distance, he tugs on his rip cord. Nothing happens. He tugs again. Nothing. The ground looms closer and closer.

Suddenly someone passes him, going the other way. “You know anything about parachutes?” yells the pilot.

The other guy yells, “No! You know anything about gas ovens?”

Bronte Baxter

© Bronte Baxter 2008

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